Articles Posted in Parole

The Court system in Alabama is slowly starting to come back to life. The Alabama Supreme Court has passed the buck on the re-opening, leaving it to each individual circuit or court to decide when and how to re-open. This has led to a patchwork of different policies around Alabama’s courts, and has also caused lawyers like us to make lots of phone calls confirming court dates on behalf of clients.

In the past weeks, lawyers from Skier & Associates have made personal appearances in several courts in Alabama, including Elmore County, Prattville Municipal Court, and Talladega County. We have upcoming dates in Montgomery County, Montgomery Municipal Court, and Barbour County. The Federal Courts in the Middle District are also holding in-person hearings. During this time, we have been party to numerous “virtual” hearings and are very pleased with the technology that has facilitated our ability to swiftly move cases through the process.

The Alabama Board of Pardons and Paroles are NOT holding in-person hearings at this time. Stake-holders there are being asked to submit their arguments in writing prior to the hearing. This is not our preferred manner of holding hearings and we encourage the Alabama Bureau of Pardons and Paroles to make accommodations for in-person or at the very least virtual hearings upon request of the applicant.

As the courts re-open, our policies remain the same. We are committed to safety for everyone, so while we remain open for business, our physical office remains closed to non-employees. We have found that Zoom is a very effective way to communicate with existing and future clients, so for everyone’s safety we are keeping this policy in place indefinitely. We do have facilities in place for signing of documents or for the presence of clients for virtual hearings that ensure the safety of everyone involved. Continue reading

At Skier & Associates, our practice is varied. We have pending cases in numerous venues including Alabama State Courts (District Court, Circuit Court, Family Court in Montgomery, Autauga, Elmore, Butler, Lowndes and other counties) Municipal Courts (Montgomery, Prattville, Millbrook and Wetumpka City Courts for example,) Federal District Courts (Middle District of Alabama) and administrative bodies (Alabama Board of Pardons and Paroles.)

All of these entities have approached their scheduling and handling of pending cases differently during the period of shut-down, and all are taking different approaches to re-opening. This can be confusing for clients as well as attorneys. Continue reading

During its 2019 Regular Session, HB 380, which restructures and places severe limitations on the powers of the Alabama Board of Pardons and Paroles passed both legislative houses and is now awaiting the Governor’s signature, which is likely. While specifics are to be hammered out during the administrative rules process, the net result will be more restrictions on early parole considerations for most inmates. Importantly, the legislation sets rules for when a parole hearing can be held, based on specific guidelines. As is the case with nearly all legislation, there is good news and bad news. Continue reading

Alabama law requires that, before the Board of Pardons and Paroles can hear a case, they must notify any identifiable victim of their right to be present at a hearing and make their feelings known on the matter. This has two effects on those awaiting a hearing: First, it can delay the hearing as the process of locating and notifying victims progresses. Second, a victim’s wishes carry significant weight with the Board.

Here are my thoughts and experiences on the matter:

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In the past few days, I have received a number of inquiries from people who have been or had a loved one denied parole or a pardon from the Alabama Board of Pardons and Paroles. These potential clients want to know how to appeal a ruling of the Pardon and Parole Board. In every case, I have to give them the bad news: There is NO APPEAL from a decision of the Board. Continue reading

Many people come to this page looking for information about Alabama’s Pardon and Parole Board. From time to time we like to update the Board’s situation and what it means for those appearing before the board on a Parole Hearing, or petitioning the Board for a Pardon.

Read on to hear about some dramatic changes to the Board’s structure, and a report on the current state of hearing delay.

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The State of Alabama incarcerates nearly 26,000 inmates in a system designed to hold 13,000. The system is staffed at a 60.4% level.[1] This combination is a recipe for disaster and will ulitmately have an adverse affect on the community at large in more ways than one. The stated Department of Corrections goal of “rehabilitation” has become a cruel joke at the expense of us all. Meanwhile, our legislature passes more and more laws requiring incarceration and takes discretion away from judges. Continue reading

After a long wait, the hearing date is finally here! What should you expect as you prepare for and appear at the parole or pardon hearing?

The Alabama Board of Pardons and Paroles has very strict rules for how they conduct a hearing, and it is important to be familiar with these rules.

The Board opens their doors at 7:30 AM every day that hearings are held. Those appearing on behalf of an applicant for either parole or a pardon fill out a form and are directed to one waiting room, while those representing victims or others protesting a parole or pardon are directed to another.

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If you find yourself in need of a criminal defense lawyer, your first inclination might be to hire a lawyer that makes you feel the best and who makes promises or assurances of a particular result or outcome. THIS IS THE WRONG WAY TO GO ABOUT SELECTING A LAWYER.

In the increasingly competitive legal market, some lawyers will exaggerate their experience or expertise, will make promises, or guarantee results in order to get your money. The most important thing to remember is that any lawyer who makes a guarantee about the outcome of a criminal case is stupid, lying, or both.

When you meet with potential lawyers, ask yourself these questions:

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